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We have formed a wonderful partnership with the Northwoods Humane Society (NHS) in Hayward, WI. On a bi-weekly basis, we "pen" an article on behalf of NHS and OCSA in the Sawyer County Record...this week we are happy to share the article written about One Health Champion Dr. Rosemary J. LoGiudice. The entire article is included in this post. Please take the time to read all - she is one amazing veterinarian who has done much to help us get the word out on the silent symptoms of ovarian cancer!

NOTE: Dr. Rosemary J. LoGiudice, DVM, Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation (DACVSMR), CCRT, CVA, CVSMT, FCoAC is the owner of Animal Rehabilitation, Therapy, & Sports Medicine (ARTS) which integrates the science and art of veterinary medicine to enhance the quality of her patients’ life. She served on the staff of the American Veterinary Association (AVMA) where she supported the One Health Initiative which was established in 2007 through the collaborative vision of Roger Mahr, DVM and Ronald Davis, MD as concurrent presidents of the AVMA and American Medical Association, respectively. In 2010, during Dr. LoGiudice’s tenure as Director of the Chicago Center for Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Kurt Klepitsch introduced the OCSA Co-Founders to Dr. LoGiudice. It was at that time she became a key advisor during the initial planning stages of OCSA’s Veterinary Outreach Program.
Dr. LoGiudice spent the first 20 years of her veterinary career specializing in equine medicine and surgery. Her practice included working with performance and working horses, including a significant concentration of Standardbred racehorses. Keeping equine athletes at their top level of performance and bringing them back to optimal performance after injury or surgery was an important aspect of her practice. The practice of veterinary physical rehabilitation was an emerging science and the canine aspect intrigued her tremendously because she was now working a lot with her own dog, Otter, an English Cocker Spaniel. She decided to become a certified Canine Rehabilitation Therapist. She established her own rehabilitation and sports medicine practice, Animal Rehabilitation, Therapy, and Sports Medicine (ARTS) in the Chicago suburbs. She recognized that she wanted to offer additional beneficial therapies, especially for pain management and mobility improvement, so she studied acupuncture through the Chi Institute of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (TCVM). While continuing her personal practice in the Chicago suburbs, she also decided to study Veterinary Spinal Manipulative Therapy (VSMT, sometimes referred to as “veterinary chiropractic”) at the Healing Oasis Wellness Center in Sturtevant, WI, where she is now a Senior Faculty member. The study of this modality heavily incorporates the functional neurology of WHY animals move and function as they do and HOW each adjustment affects the nervous system. It changed how she watches animals move and how she practices. It was truly a “life and practice changing” moment.

Learning about integrative veterinary therapies such as VSMT and acupuncture that can be combined with traditional veterinary therapies to help her animal patients achieve optimal mobility and even performance, all led her down the path of practicing sports medicine and rehabilitation. There is so much that can be done to help animal patients achieve optimal mobility, comfort, performance, and quality of life besides what is taught and practiced in traditional veterinary medicine. It is tremendously rewarding to help animal patients who are also furry friends and companions to be the best they can be and provide a heightened human-animal bond with the best quality of life for as long as possible. Those integrative veterinary therapies are truly “patient based” however she probably uses VSMT more than acupuncture because using her hands allows her to see results more consistently and she understands and can more easily explain how it directly affects the nervous system.

Her practice is limited to horses, dogs and cats and there are challenges with each group.

Horses…she learned long ago that you have to learn to finesse a horse. It doesn’t matter how big you are, if a horse doesn’t want to do what you’d like it to do, you cannot make it and it can hurt you, even if you are trying to be careful. You have to learn to “read” the horse and work with it to accomplish your therapeutic goals for the horse. Horses are, for the most part, willing to work with you, but you have to calmly work with them and win their confidence. Horses are her first love in working with animals. Especially with VSMT, once a horse has been worked with and they experience the relief that VSMT can provide, they often will “tell” you where they need work. If you pay attention, horses are very responsive.

Dogs, especially those that are food or toy motivated, can become very accepting of examination and therapies. With dogs, you do need to learn to work with them because sometimes when they are in pain or uncomfortable, their reaction may be to bite, hide or cower. Positive reinforcement is so important to shape the behavior so that dogs enjoy coming to therapy. She uses lots of treats when possible, including frozen natural peanut butter lick mats and lots of praise. It is especially rewarding when you can successfully treat a dog that has experienced an issue that inhibits their mobility. Dogs that are companions want to be with their people and when their mobility is compromised, their quality of life, as well as the quality of life of their person (or people) is also compromised.

Cats are really fun but can be a challenge to work with. Unfortunately, they don’t usually show pain or mobility issues until a condition is advanced. That is just the nature of most cats. Since many cats are not treat motivated or trained to walk and function on a leash the same way dogs are, other methods must be used. She often says that to encourage a cat to perform therapies such as therapeutic exercises, you have to make it the cat’s idea. Anyone who is owned by a cat(s) understands this concept! She likes to talk about a wonderful success story, Buster L. Kitten, (who has his own Facebook page), who was a great example of watching and learning.

NOTE: In early November of 2016, at the age of 14 years, the author’s Afghan hound, Sharrah’s Ch Khalin (the official spokes dog of the Ovarian Cancer Symptom Awareness Organization from 2010-2017) suffered a mini-stroke, which caused him to lose the function of his rear legs. He was referred to Dr LoGiudice by his primary care veterinarian Dr Kurt Klepitsch. When Ch Khalin, who was accompanied by his owner and Roger Mahr, DVM met with Dr LoGiudice and after a thorough examination she prescribed a rehabilitation program that consisted of veterinary acupuncture, chiropractic treatments, and therapeutic exercise, massage and laser therapy. His profound improvement was a result of collaborative efforts between his veterinarians and their veterinary technical staffs.
TITLE KEY: CCRT: Certified Canine Rehabilitation Therapist; CVA: Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist; CVSMT: Certified Veterinary Spinal Manipulation Therapy; FCoAC: Fellow of the College of Animal Chiropractor
... See MoreSee Less

We have formed a wonderful partnership with the Northwoods Humane Society (NHS) in Hayward, WI.  On a bi-weekly basis, we pen an article on behalf of NHS and OCSA in the Sawyer County Record...this week we are happy to share the article written about One Health Champion Dr. Rosemary J. LoGiudice.  The entire article is included in this post. Please take the time to read all - she is one amazing veterinarian who has done much to help us get the word out on the silent symptoms of ovarian cancer!  

NOTE: Dr. Rosemary J. LoGiudice, DVM, Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation (DACVSMR), CCRT, CVA, CVSMT, FCoAC is the owner of Animal Rehabilitation, Therapy, & Sports Medicine (ARTS) which integrates the science and art of veterinary medicine to enhance the quality of her patients’ life. She served on the staff of the American Veterinary Association (AVMA) where she supported the One Health Initiative which was established in 2007 through the collaborative vision of Roger Mahr, DVM and Ronald Davis, MD as concurrent presidents of the AVMA and American Medical Association, respectively.  In 2010, during Dr. LoGiudice’s tenure as Director of the Chicago Center for Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Kurt Klepitsch introduced the OCSA Co-Founders to Dr. LoGiudice.  It was at that time she became a key advisor during the initial planning stages of OCSA’s Veterinary Outreach Program.
Dr. LoGiudice spent the first 20 years of her veterinary career specializing in equine medicine and surgery. Her practice included working with performance and working horses, including a significant concentration of Standardbred racehorses. Keeping equine athletes at their top level of performance and bringing them back to optimal performance after injury or surgery was an important aspect of her practice.  The practice of veterinary physical rehabilitation was an emerging science and the canine aspect intrigued her tremendously because she was now working a lot with her own dog, Otter, an English Cocker Spaniel. She decided to become a certified Canine Rehabilitation Therapist. She established her own rehabilitation and sports medicine practice, Animal Rehabilitation, Therapy, and Sports Medicine (ARTS) in the Chicago suburbs. She recognized that she wanted to offer additional beneficial therapies, especially for pain management and mobility improvement, so she studied acupuncture through the Chi Institute of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (TCVM).  While continuing her personal practice in the Chicago suburbs, she also decided to study Veterinary Spinal Manipulative Therapy (VSMT, sometimes referred to as “veterinary chiropractic”) at the Healing Oasis Wellness Center in Sturtevant, WI, where she is now a Senior Faculty member. The study of this modality heavily incorporates the functional neurology of WHY animals move and function as they do and HOW each adjustment affects the nervous system.  It changed how she watches animals move and how she practices. It was truly a “life and practice changing” moment.

Learning about integrative veterinary therapies such as VSMT and acupuncture that can be combined with traditional veterinary therapies to help her animal patients achieve optimal mobility and even performance, all led her down the path of practicing sports medicine and rehabilitation. There is so much that can be done to help animal patients achieve optimal mobility, comfort, performance, and quality of life besides what is taught and practiced in traditional veterinary medicine.  It is tremendously rewarding to help animal patients who are also furry friends and companions to be the best they can be and provide a heightened human-animal bond with the best quality of life for as long as possible. Those integrative veterinary therapies are truly “patient based” however she probably uses VSMT more than acupuncture because using her hands allows her to see results more consistently and she understands and can more easily explain how it directly affects the nervous system.  

Her practice is limited to horses, dogs and cats and there are challenges with each group. 

Horses…she learned long ago that you have to learn to finesse a horse. It doesn’t matter how big you are, if a horse doesn’t want to do what you’d like it to do, you cannot make it and it can hurt you, even if you are trying to be careful. You have to learn to “read” the horse and work with it to accomplish your therapeutic goals for the horse. Horses are, for the most part, willing to work with you, but you have to calmly work with them and win their confidence. Horses are her first love in working with animals. Especially with VSMT, once a horse has been worked with and they experience the relief that VSMT can provide, they often will “tell” you where they need work. If you pay attention, horses are very responsive.

Dogs, especially those that are food or toy motivated, can become very accepting of examination and therapies. With dogs, you do need to learn to work with them because sometimes when they are in pain or uncomfortable, their reaction may be to bite, hide or cower. Positive reinforcement is so important to shape the behavior so that dogs enjoy coming to therapy. She uses lots of treats when possible, including frozen natural peanut butter lick mats and lots of praise. It is especially rewarding when you can successfully treat a dog that has experienced an issue that inhibits their mobility. Dogs that are companions want to be with their people and when their mobility is compromised, their quality of life, as well as the quality of life of their person (or people) is also compromised.  

Cats are really fun but can be a challenge to work with. Unfortunately, they don’t usually show pain or mobility issues until a condition is advanced. That is just the nature of most cats. Since many cats are not treat motivated or trained to walk and function on a leash the same way dogs are, other methods must be used. She often says that to encourage a cat to perform therapies such as therapeutic exercises, you have to make it the cat’s idea. Anyone who is owned by a cat(s) understands this concept! She likes to talk about a wonderful success story, Buster L. Kitten, (who has his own Facebook page), who was a great example of watching and learning.

 NOTE: In early November of 2016, at the age of 14 years, the author’s Afghan hound, Sharrah’s Ch Khalin (the official spokes dog of the Ovarian Cancer Symptom Awareness Organization from 2010-2017) suffered a mini-stroke, which caused him to lose the function of his rear legs. He was referred to Dr LoGiudice by his primary care veterinarian Dr Kurt Klepitsch. When Ch Khalin, who was accompanied by his owner and Roger Mahr, DVM met with Dr LoGiudice and after a thorough examination she prescribed a rehabilitation program that consisted of veterinary acupuncture, chiropractic treatments, and therapeutic exercise, massage and laser therapy.  His profound improvement was a result of collaborative efforts between his veterinarians and their veterinary technical staffs.
TITLE KEY: CCRT: Certified Canine Rehabilitation Therapist; CVA: Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist; CVSMT: Certified Veterinary Spinal Manipulation Therapy; FCoAC: Fellow of the College of Animal ChiropractorImage attachmentImage attachment

We will celebrate our 10th anniversary in the Northwoods, Saturday, July 11 from 2-4pm on the patio of Blackiron Resort, Hayward, WI...enjoying the music of John Sonofmel, creative "OCSA Logo Cookies" by Caken me Crazy and of course amazing appetizers crafted by Chef Mike Burkauskas! So many wonderful friends and supporters, collectively helping us to "get the word out on the silent symptoms of ovarian cancer". So if you are in the area, please join us! ... See MoreSee Less

We will celebrate our 10th anniversary in the Northwoods, Saturday, July 11 from 2-4pm on the patio of Blackiron Resort, Hayward, WI...enjoying the music of John Sonofmel, creative OCSA Logo Cookies by Caken me Crazy and of course  amazing appetizers crafted by Chef Mike Burkauskas!  So many wonderful friends and supporters, collectively helping us to get the word out on the silent symptoms of ovarian cancer.   So if you are in the area, please join us!
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